cleanfirst
asbestos removal in toronto

Signs You Need to Hire Experts in Asbestos Removal in Toronto

Posted by | asbestos | No Comments

At one time, having asbestos in your home was considered a great feature.

Not so much anymore. 

This heat and water resistant material was popular to use in home construction until the 1980s. However, we now know that asbestos can cause major lung problems, including lung cancer. 

You should consider asbestos removal in Toronto, as many older homes still contain it. Here are a few things to know about it, and how to get rid of asbestos with the help of professionals. 

The History of Asbestos

We often think of asbestos as a fairly modern material, but the truth is its use goes back a lot further than that. In fact, it’s believed that asbestos was used in candle wicks as far back as 4000 B.C. 

In the Middle Ages, King Charlemagne of France had a tablecloth made from asbestos to keep it from setting aflame (fires apparently occurred often during celebrations and feasts.) 

In the centuries following, asbestos has appeared in handbags, paper currency, and firefighter gear (makes sense as a fire retardant.) In short, asbestos has been in almost everything. 

Modern homes built after 1920 (to about 1989 or so) are no different. Many building materials up until the 1980s contained asbestos for strength and fire protection, which is ideal… until of course, the asbestos is disturbed from damage or a renovation. 

Despite it being used for several man-made applications, asbestos is not artificial like some insulations. It is a natural silicate mineral that is mined from the ground. 

Mining of asbestos became popular in the late 19th century. Canada’s remaining asbestos mines were shut down in 2012, but it’s still being mined in Russia and China among other countries.  

How To Check For Asbestos

There are places in your home that you may not suspect contain asbestos, but they do. For example, you know that stucco textured white ceiling in your older home? It’s also called “popcorn ceiling,” and it has asbestos. 

Other common places in the home that may contain asbestos include:

• Asbestos blankets covering pipes and boilers

• Furnace door gaskets 

• Certain floor tiles, backings of floor tiles, and some flooring adhesives

• Insulation around wood stoves

• Shingles and siding

Since many pipes and other components might not be visible to you, you may not know about them until a renovation is being performed. A good building contractor can sometimes spot asbestos, but it doesn’t mean they’re trained to get rid of it. 

How do you know whether a material contains asbestos? It’s actually difficult to tell for sure, although it looks kind of like fluffy old insulation in many cases. However, it could be hiding in solid objects like walls and tiles. First, consider the age of your home – that’s your first clue.

If your home was constructed in the past 20 or even 25 years, then it probably won’t contain any asbestos. At least, it shouldn’t contain any. 

Look for pipe insulation that seems to be flaking or disintegrating. You should also watch for insulation, walls, or vinyl floor tiles that are crumbling or falling apart. 

Health Conditions Related To Asbestos

Asbestos is dangerous when it is released into the air due to materials breaking down. You may then breathe in tiny asbestos fibers without even knowing it. 

The tiny fibers released from asbestos can get lodged in your lungs, which can cause scarring over time. This condition is also known as Interstitial Lung Disease, which is also called asbestosis. It can make it harder to breathe, as well as prevent enough oxygen from getting into your bloodstream. 

Here’s the thing about asbestos exposure: you may not have any signs of lung problems for up to 30 years after being exposed. There is no cure, but there are treatments available. 

Breathing in asbestos can also heighten the risk of lung cancer, as well as mesothelioma cancer, which is a cancer of the lung linings. In fact, the National Cancer Institute in the U.S. identified asbestos as a lung cancer risk in the early 1940s.

It can take more than a decade to develop symptoms of lung cancer related to asbestos exposure.

Canada has recently taken measures to ban asbestos-containing products. However, in the U.S., asbestos is still legal despite being recognized as a hazardous pollutant. 

It’s not just homes in Toronto that have asbestos problems – many commercial buildings do as well. In fact, research shows that asbestos exposure is the leading cause of workplace death. And experts expect asbestos-related health problems to continue, because of the delayed effects. 

Why to Hire Experts

You may be a DIY type, and that’s great. However, when you start sledge-hammering materials to make way for new features, you could unwittingly be putting yourself and your family in danger. 

You’ll want to hire a company that does testing for asbestos and can get rid of it safely before you start your renovation. In fact, it’s law in Ontario to identify any asbestos in homes built before 1986 and give this information to the home contractors. 

Without the proper gear and experience, you may be putting your health at risk if you skip this step. if you’re unsure whether your home materials contain asbestos, it’s best to leave it to the experts.

This is also a good opportunity to hire an expert to look for mold in your home that could also be causing health issues. 

Finding The Best Asbestos Removal in Toronto

There are many companies that claim to be experts in asbestos abatement, but be sure you’re dealing with a company that is certified in the practice. 

A company that offers asbestos removal in Toronto will take the proper safety measures, and will also use a vacuum during removal to ensure none of the particles escape into your home’s air. The company will also offer disposal and containment of asbestos materials, so you don’t have to deal with it. 

Asbestos removal is not expensive, but ignoring the risks and releasing it into your the air in your home or business could carry much bigger costs – like your health. 

Don’t let cracking asbestos materials or a seemingly harmless renovation affect your health. Contact us today for a free assessment.

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Email this to someone
email

Mildew vs Mold: What’s the Difference and When Should You Worry?

Posted by | Blog | No Comments

Hanging a large mirror or painting can hide a multitude of sins, from cracks to stains. Good job? Well, not if you’re trying to cover up mold. Not only is it unsightly, but it can also cause serious health problems. 

It’s not just mold that can cause issues, mildew can as well. It’s important to understand the difference between mildew vs mold so that you know how best to treat them. Here’s the lowdown.

Mildew vs Mold

Mildew is a type of mold. Both are types of fungi which love damp surroundings and spread across surfaces easily. They can be a nuisance in the home and each of them can be a danger to health.

There are though differences between them. For example, they tend to prefer growing in slightly different places and the degree of risk they pose is also not quite the same.

Places Mold Likes to Grow

Mold will thrive in warm, dark and damp environments. That could apply to any part of your home given the right circumstances. Bathrooms and showers, mattresses on beds and insulation in your attic are common places for mold to grow.

It’s not uncommon to spot mold in damp locations like sheds, garages, and on boats.

Mold spores can be carried into your house on shoes and clothes without you ever realizing it. Once inside, if the conditions are right, mold will grow there and spread fast.

Checking for Mold in the Home

If mold isn’t stopped in its tracks, it can and will cause damage to your home. It’s wise to check for mold routinely. The main ways to do this are through sight and smell.

Mold comes in lots of colors. Black, yellow, green, and brown are but a few. When it appears on a flat surface such as a wall it generally forms irregular shapes. It can also look hazy to the naked eye. 

Mold breaks down organic material so it could be the material under the mold is rotting. This can bring with it smells due to the chemicals the mold releases. The most usual description of the odor of mold is musty. 

Places Mildew Likes to Grow

Mildew prefers flat surfaces to grow on. Any damage caused by it in the home tends to be just cosmetic. In that respect, it’s the lesser of the two evils when either of these two uninvited guests enters the home.

Outdoors, it can cause significant damage to plants. It is considered to be less of a health risk in the home than mold can be. It’s also easier to treat.

Checking for Mildew in the Home 

Mildew loves damp, warm and dark places. It thrives on flat surfaces and is commonly found on window sills and shower surrounds. It’s also found on smaller objects that have damp surfaces.

Paper, fabrics or leather which for some reason has become wet, are often targets for mildew. Mildew will grow rapidly when conditions are right. It can be powdery or have a sort of downy look about it. 

When it’s powdery, it will be white in color when it first appears, although this can change to yellow, brown, or black as it grows. The downy type of mildew begins by being yellow and then turns brown as it ages.

Like mold, mildew tends to have a musty smell. The best way to tell the difference between mold and mildew is by sight. If you’re struggling to decide, then it may be time to call the professionals who will be able to test for both. 

Harmful Effects of Mold and Mildew

Neither mold nor mildew is particularly pleasant in the wrong places. Mildew doesn’t usually leave any lasting damage to the flat surfaces it grows on such as mirrors or tiled bathroom floors. 

When inhaled mildew spores can cause coughing, headaches or breathing problems.  The adverse effects of mold are likely to be much more serious. It can cause devastating structural damage to buildings and even cars.

Mold can cause long-lasting health issues. These can range from heart problems to depression. On top of this, some people have a mold allergy. This can cause skin and eye irritations along with nasal congestion.

Mold and Mildew Prevention

The best way to stop mold and mildew getting into your home is to create an environment that they won’t like. There are lots of measures you can take to help prevent mold in the home.

Make sure your home has good air circulation and gets plenty of fresh air. Reducing humidity is key. Purchasing a dehumidifier could be a wise investment. 

You should make sure your heating and cooling systems are checked often. Keeping air ducts clean will also help to prevent spores from spreading. Ensure you have no leaks in either the bathroom or kitchen. 

Cleaning Mildew Away

Mildew is fairly easy to clean. It can be wiped away with a specialist cleaner and brush. It’s important to stay safe while you’re doing this. You should wear rubber gloves and a facial mask so that you avoid breathing in spores.

Go the extra mile and clean around any infected areas to be sure all the mildew is completely gone.

Getting Rid of Mold

If the area of mold is around ten square feet or less then generally it should be possible to clean the area yourself. This is provided you take the necessary safety precautions.

It could be you’ve had an unexpected leak and notice mold soon afterward. Fixing the leak quickly and cleaning away mold should be fine. If you’ve larger areas of mold, then it’s definitely the moment to bring in a mold remediation company

Mold can get beneath surfaces, spread quickly and survive in the toughest conditions. Even though it has its own particular smell, it’s only possible to see mold once the colonies have started to grow. 

Time to Call the Professionals

Trying to clean large areas of mold yourself is a health hazard and is unlikely to be effective. When it comes to mildew vs mold inside the home, then mildew is the easier to clean away and is less likely to cause such severe long-term health issues.

Read more here about the dangers of mold and how we can help. We are the experts. 

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook

Facebook

Tweet about this on Twitter

Share on LinkedIn

Email this to someone

mold remediation company

How to Find the Best Mold Remediation Company

Posted by | Blog, Mold Removal | No Comments

If you suspect mold has started growing in your home, there’s a possibility of health risks. At the very least, if someone in your family has a mold allergy, they could start showing symptoms such as sneezing, itchy eyes, and cough.

The good news is, mold removal experts can take care of the problem before it gets worse. In addition to removing the mold, professionals will address the moisture issue that caused the problem in the first place. This ensures mold doesn’t form again down the road.

However, it’s important you work with the best mold remediation company in your area. To help you out, we’re going over some tips for finding qualified professionals.

Let’s get started

Experience Is Crucial

The mold remediation process is tricky, which means you need to work with a company that has years of industry experience. This ensures they have the equipment and know-how to remove mold effectively.

You’ll want to look for someone with a long-standing reputation in your area. If you can’t tell how long they’ve been in business by looking at their website, call and ask.

You should also look for a company that has experience with a wide range of services such as mold inspection and air quality testing. This means they’ve likely seen all manner of situations and can quickly diagnose your problem.

The last thing you want is an inexperienced technician making assumptions on the best way to tackle the issue.

Check for Industry Certifications and Licenses

It’s important the mold remediation specialists you work with hold licenses and certifications. This means they’ve gone through the proper training and are highly educated.

Mold comes in many forms. Some types, such as black mold, pose a serious health threat. The company you work with needs to be able to identify molds and understand how they spread.

In addition, the best companies will have gone through adequate training on remediation techniques. This involves the decontamination process and understanding the equipment and technology involved.

When speaking with a business about treating your home, inquire about these credentials. If they can’t provide you with certifications, you should continue searching for the right company.

Ask About Insurance

In addition to holding certifications, the company you work with should also carry insurance. This protects you if any damage occurs during the mold remediation process.

Unfortunately, some disreputable businesses will tell you they have coverage just to get your business. That’s why it’s important to ask to see it. Any professional company won’t mind showing you proof.

At the very least, a company should have general liability insurance in place. You may also want to check for pollution insurance. This covers companies that handle hazardous waste, in this case, mold or asbestos.

Asking about insurance isn’t only important for protecting your property from damages. It shows that the company you’re working with is dependable and has the resources needed to protect themselves and their clients.

Read Customer Reviews

It’s now commonplace for consumers to check online reviews before buying products or hiring a company. This is a great way to get a firsthand account of the type of work a business does.

When reading customer reviews for a company, keep in mind that a few negative reviews don’t necessarily mean they provide bad service. In fact, sometimes a business’s competitors will post negative reviews to drive customers away.

Instead, pay attention to a large number of negative reviews for the same thing. For example, you may see a number of reviews about bad customer service or unexpected fees. If you encounter this, looking at other companies is probably a good idea.

Ask for References

When trying to find the best company for your needs, there’s nothing wrong with asking for references. Any reputable business won’t mind providing you with some.

Talking to references is a great way to get a sense of the type of service a company provides. When doing so, ask the past customer how they felt about the process and if the company lived up to their promises. This will instill you with peace of mind when hiring someone.

You should also check a company’s website to see if they’ve listed some of their past clients. If they’ve provided mold remediation for larger businesses, this means they have the resources and knowledge to tackle any mold issue.

Do They Guarantee Your Satisfaction?

You want to work with a company that stands by their work. If they do, they’ll offer a satisfaction guarantee to their clients.

If you don’t see proof of a guarantee on their website, ask them if they offer one. You’ll also need to get the details.

A guarantee protects you if the mold ends up returning after remediation is done. You don’t want to have to pay for service twice in a short period of time.

Companies that offer satisfaction guarantees typically take measures to ensure the work gets done right and the mold won’t return. This means repairing the areas where moisture is present.  

Get Quotes

It’s important to get quotes from every company you consider doing business with. Not only does this ensure you stay within your budget, but it also protects you from getting overcharged.

Keep in mind that the price for mold remediation will depend on how widespread the issue is. That’s why it’s important to shop around and get a sense of what the job will cost.

Obviously, you’ll want to work with a company that provides a reasonable rate. However, don’t let an extremely low quote draw you in. Some businesses do that just to get your business and then provide sub-par service.

Find an Experience Mold Remediation Company Today

When dealing with a mold issue, time is of the essence. The longer you allow it to spread, the more time-consuming and costly it’ll be to remove.

The second you notice a problem, use the tips discussed above to find the best mold remediation company in your area.

We provide mold remediation and inspection services in Toronto and surrounding areas. Contact us today set up an appointment.

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook

Facebook

Tweet about this on Twitter

Share on LinkedIn

Email this to someone

mold in the home

Mold in the Home: Why is It So Dangerous?

Posted by | Blog, Mold Exposure | No Comments

In the wet months of the year, nothing is more annoying to a homeowner than household mold. When it’s cold and wet outside, all we want to do is curl up with the heat cranked on and hibernate the day away. But these conditions can lead to mold in the house in no time.

It can feel like nothing is safe from mold. What starts out as a tiny spot can turn into a microbial wildfire in no time, forcing you to put your prized possessions in the garbage.

But is mold more than just an annoyance? Is it something that could potentially cause health hazards that could be detrimental to your whole family?

Read on to learn more about what to do when there is mold in the home.

What You Need to Know About Mold

Mold is a fungus made up of tiny organisms. These organisms are a crucial part of nature, as they work to break down dead things and turn them into usable energy for the earth. It thrives on moisture and creates tiny spores that move through the air.

There’s no escaping mold. It’s everywhere, and that’s a good thing. But when mold starts to creep into your house and reproduce, you could have a problem.

Mold is also adaptable. It can grow on tons of surfaces, like clothing, wood, and paper. And the way it looks changes depending on the type of mold growth in your home.

Some common appearances of molds can be colors like yellow, white, or blue. They can look rough or soft and fuzzy, depending on the type of mold and where it’s growing.

How Does Mold Get Into the Home?

Mold is sneaky. It’s had to adapt in order to survive all this time! We can’t see the tiny spores, but as we mentioned earlier, they’re everywhere.

All it takes for mold to sneak into your home is for a few spores to attach on someone or something entering your home. If you keep your windows or doors open, that’s another way for mold to creep in. We can say the same for ventilation systems.

But mold can only grow if the spores land in just the right spot. That is– places with lots of moisture and the right balance of heat and darkness. A few things for the growing spores to feed off of won’t hurt either.

Once mold starts to grow, it’s hard to miss unless it’s hidden away. On top of the changing appearance of your home, you’ll notice a musty smell.

So it sounds like mold is inescapable. So… is it really such a bad thing?

The Health Effects of Mold

While you’re not wrong in wanting a home clear of mold, that’s not to say that it all causes health problems. The average person with healthy lungs isn’t likely to experience any major health issues stemming from mold inhalation.

But mold does produce a few things that can hurt people with sensitivities. Mold creates allergens, irritants, and substances that can be toxic.

Mold can be an irritant for anything from your eyes to your throat, even if you’re not allergic to mold.

People with mold allergies can experience things liked runny or stuffy noses, itchy throats, sneezing, and watery eyes.

Another thing to consider when it comes to the level of danger surrounding mold is the lung health of the people in your family. If someone has asthma, their chances of having an asthmatic episode increase when mold is around. This is especially true if they’ve got a mold allergy.

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn’t consider mold exposure to always be a health problem, the World Health Organization has a different take on the matter.

To the WHO, mold should be considered dangerous at all times because the environment that mold thrives in can create chemical and biological changes that pollute the air. According to the WHO, they consider people who are in contact with mold at risk for respiratory health issues.

How to Protect the Home From Mold

Whether or not two of the world’s leading health organizations can agree on the dangers associated with mold, it’s important to take care of it right away.

The best way to fight against mold is to stop it before it starts to grow in your house. And while you can’t stop the spores from attaching to your clothing or sneaking in through an open window, you can eliminate the environment that mold likes to grow in.

Make sure that your home doesn’t have a ton of wet areas or places that stay damp for a long time. Ventilate your kitchen, bathroom, and laundry room. Also, you should do whatever you can to make sure that outdoor water stays outdoors.

What to Do if You Find Mold in the Home

If you think you might have an issue of mold in the home, you can probably take care of it yourself. Spray an antimicrobial agent onto the mold and scrub it thoroughly with a brush. It’s a good idea to wear protective gear while you do this, just in case.

When you’re done, make sure you wash your clothes so the mold spores don’t follow you to other areas of your house.

If your mold issue is too big for you to handle alone, you can always call a professional for help.

The Truth About Household Mold

The growth of mold in the home is never a pleasant sight. No one likes walking into their home knowing that the air is musty and that there’s an unsightly patch of mold growing somewhere. However, just because it’s ugly doesn’t mean it’s going to pose a threat to your health.

You should always take care of any mold issues as soon as they arise, regardless of whether you’re allergic to it.

For more information about restoring a damaged area of your home, give us a call today!

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook

Facebook

Tweet about this on Twitter

Share on LinkedIn

Email this to someone

how to identify asbestos

How to Identify Asbestos in Your Home and Other Obvious Signs

Posted by | asbestos | No Comments

Do you have any major home repair projects coming up? Are you 100% sure that your home is free of all toxins?

Almost 250,000 homes across Canada have some asbestos in their tiles, plumbing, or insulation. If your home was built prior to 1986, you’re at high risk for asbestos in the home.

If you’re wondering how to identify asbestos, this article’s for you. We’ll give you the straight scoop on asbestos in the home and help you get started with a local asbestos removal company.

What is Asbestos?

Asbestos is a combination of six naturally-occurring minerals. It has been in use for more than 100 years. It resists heat and has been used in thousands of products including roofing material, hair dryers, and brake pads.

The reason it was used for so long is that it’s resistant to heat and extremely strong and durable. In the last few decades, however, researchers noticed that tiny particles of asbestos break off when it gets moved or damaged.

Those tiny particles float through the air and become lodged in people’s lungs, causing serious illnesses like asbestosis and mesothelioma. In fact, asbestos exposure is the only way that a person can get mesothelioma, an uncommon form of lung cancer.

Signs of Asbestos in Homes

If your home was built before 1986, there’s a good chance that you’ve got asbestos somewhere in your home. The good news is that asbestos doesn’t become dangerous until you disturb it.

If your insulation is in good shape, you don’t have to worry about microscopic particles. However, you should take the time to get a professional evaluation. It can be hard to tell if you’ve got asbestos without an outside lab test.

Potential sources of asbestos include heating ducts that have a distinctive white tape on them, boiler insulation materials, “acoustic” tiles on your ceiling, and asbestos-filled concrete or cement siding.

There is also some cause for concern if your floor tiles measure exactly nine inches by nine inches. Of course, not every floor tile of this size contains asbestos, but it’s still worth checking out if your tiles are that size and in bad shape.

Other potential locations of asbestos in homes include a “popcorn” ceiling, attic insulation that contains vermiculite, and floor mastic.

Again, you don’t have to worry about asbestos removal if your home is in good shape. You may want to have it removed to ensure it won’t be a problem.

If you’re thinking of starting a home improvement project, it’s probably best to wait for the lab results.

How to Identify Asbestos Poisoning

If you’ve been exposed to asbestos for years, you do have a risk of asbestos poisoning. Asbestosis is a serious condition that you might not realize you have. The problem is that it can seem like mold poisoning.

Symptoms of asbestosis include shortness of breath, a persistent cough, and a feeling of constriction in your chest. You may also notice that your fingers have become wider at the tips, a phenomenon known as “clubbing.”

People who work near asbestos are at a higher risk for asbestosis and mesothelioma, but your home could still be making you sick. If you worked in construction, on a ship, or as an asbestos removal technician, you have a higher chance for serious illness.

If you have asbestos insulation in poor condition that’s close to your furnace, there’s a good chance that it’s airborne. Your first step is to figure out whether your home has asbestos in it. If you have symptoms of asbestos poisoning, you should immediately see a doctor.

Is There a Certification for Asbestos Removal?

When it’s time to find an asbestos removal specialist, you should make sure they’re certified. There is a certification process for asbestos removal and certain steps that contractors need to follow.

Before you get started with removal, your assessment company should provide you with a detailed, written record of the asbestos in your home. They should definitely test all suspected materials within your home.

You should use a different removal company than your assessment company. This step will make sure you’re only getting the removal services that you need.

Also, make sure that your removal company is accredited, bonded, and insured. You should ask for local references and client testimonials. If they can’t provide references, it’s time to find another contractor.

When the contractor is doing work in your home, it’s vital that they seal off the area they’re working on. The last thing you want is for airborne asbestos to contaminate the rest of your home.

They should seal off all wall vents, wall outlets, and windows. Make sure that children and pets are also removed from the area.

Home-based asbestos is not as common as asbestos in commercial buildings, but it’s still important that your removal company has a good reputation.

Asbestos that’s in good condition doesn’t need to be removed. In fact, disturbing it could kick up the airborne particles that cause disease.

Find a Local Asbestos Removal Company

In general, you should get your home’s air quality tested at least once per year. You could have dust, mold, or other toxins contaminating your indoor air.

If you are wondering how to identify asbestos in your office or retail store, leave it to the professionals. They’ll perform laboratory tests and give you a blueprint for asbestos removal, just like your home.

We’ve been serving the greater Toronto area for more than 29 years. We offer indoor air quality testing, mold remediation, and asbestos removal.

All of our mold technicians are certified, and we’re also certified for asbestos removal. If your property was built before 1986, you have a much higher chance of having asbestos materials like on drywall compound, flooring,and insulation.

It’s important to invest in asbestos removal because it can take years before you see symptoms. The sooner we can get your home back to normal, the better you’ll feel.

We offer asbestos assessments, so give us a call or send us an email online. We’ll gladly come out and evaluate your home’s condition right away.

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook

Facebook

Tweet about this on Twitter

Share on LinkedIn

Email this to someone

mold remediation company

Why Indoor Air Quality is So Important

Posted by | Blog, Indoor air quality testing | No Comments

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 4.3 million people die every year from indoor air pollution.

Nearly 34% die from stroke, 26% from heart disease, 22% from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 12% from pneumonia, and 6% from lung cancer.

Although when we think of pollution, we tend to imagine smoke-filled skies and car exhaust, there is also the hidden danger of indoor air pollution.

Indoor air quality is more important than you think. Want to learn more? Read on to learn why indoor air quality is important and ways to improve your home air quality.

What Causes Indoor Air Pollution?

Indoor air pollution occurs when particles and gases are present in indoor living areas. There are many different causes of poor indoor air quality. Read on to learn about some of the most common pollutants.

Cigarette Smoke

Secondhand smoke is a serious contributor to indoor air pollution.

Cigarette smoke has thousands of toxic chemicals such as ammonia, carbon monoxide, cyanide, and lead. People who don’t smoke breathe in the same hazardous chemicals as smokers do.

According to WHO, 3,000 people die every year from lung cancer due to indoor air pollution caused by secondhand smoke. Compare this to the 100 lung cancer deaths every year caused from outdoor air pollution.

Asbestos

Asbestos is a group of silicate minerals that was used in construction material. In Canada, a variety of products used asbestos such as building insulation, industrial heating systems, floor tiles, and even car brake pads.

Canada was the top producer and exporter of chrysotile asbestos in the world.

However, when asbestos fibers become disturbed, such as during construction or remodeling, microscopic fibers can get into the lungs and result in a type of deadly cancer called mesothelioma.

In fact, because of the high rate of asbestos production, mesothelioma rates in Canada are one of the highest in the world. About 2.1 out of 100,000 Canadians become diagnosed with mesothelioma every year.

Carbon Monoxide

Carbon monoxide is a colorless and odorless gas. It can come from sources such as gas stoves, automobile exhaust, and leaking furnaces.

At low and moderate amounts, carbon monoxide results in fatigue, problems with vision, and reduced brain function. At higher levels, this toxic gas results in headaches, dizziness, loss of consciousness, and death.

Biological Pollutants

Biological pollutants are microbes in the air such as mold, dust, bacteria, and viruses. These pollutants come from many different sources. Viruses travel from person to person. Mold grows from moisture.

Dust comes from normal human activity. Pollen and pet dander comes from your pets and plants. All these pollutants are particles in the air and are present in your indoor air.

Why is Indoor Air Quality Important?

According to the EPA, research indicates that indoor air quality is worse than outdoor air quality.

Improving indoor air quality is important because of the associated health dangers of indoor air pollution. For example, secondhand smoke causes similar health issues that smoking does such as bronchitis, pneumonia, and lung cancer.

Read on to see the most serious problems that poor indoor air quality contributes to.

Serious Diseases

Indoor air pollution exposure nearly doubles the risk of pneumonia in children. In fact, indoor air pollution causes 45% of all childhood pneumonia deaths. Poor air quality contributes to 28% of pneumonia deaths in adults.

Other serious diseases from indoor air pollution include stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), ischaemic heart disease, and lung cancer.

Asthma

Indoor air pollution can make asthma symptoms worse. Research reveals that individuals with moderate to severe asthma had a 40% higher chance of suffering from an asthma episode on summer days with high pollution than on summer days with normal pollution levels.

Allergies

If you have allergies, biological contaminants such as mold and pet dander can cause allergic reactions. Mold can even cause irritation of the eyes and skin.

What Can You Do to Improve Indoor Air Quality?

Fortunately, there are things you can do to improve indoor air quality and reduce the risks of indoor air pollution. Here are some steps you can take.

Don’t Allow Smoking in Your Home

One of the top ways you can drastically reduce indoor air pollution is to keep your home smoke-free.

If you smoke, you should quit, or at least don’t smoke inside your home. For guests who smoke, insist that they stay outside while smoking.

Check Your Home for Asbestos

You should have your house checked for asbestos. If your home was built before 1986, there is a high chance it may have asbestos.

If there is asbestos present in your home, you should have it removed by professionals only as these fibers can be dangerous when disturbed.

Keep Humidity at the Right Level

According to the EPA, you should keep your humidity levels at home between 30% to 50%. You can use moisture meters to check levels. This can help prevent mold.

Other tips for mold prevention include using ventilation in areas like the bathroom and kitchen. You should also check your home for leaky pipes or faucets.

Keep Your Home Clean

Regularly vacuum and dust your home to keep away dust, pet dander, and other contaminants.

You should vacuum carpeted areas at least twice a week with a vacuum that has a HEPA filter. If possible, consider installing hardwood or any other non-carpet flooring throughout your home.

You should also wash your linens and beddings regularly. Another tip is to have a clutter-free home. Clutter attracts dust and allergens.

Keep Your Windows Open

When possible, keep your windows open to let in fresh air. During warmer months, turn on the ceiling fans to circulate the air. When cooking, use fans and proper ventilation.

Have Your Indoor Air Quality Tested

To know for sure what pollutants are lurking in your home, you should have your indoor air quality tested.

If you know what contaminants are in the air, you can take the steps to remove them and create a healthy indoor environment for your home.

Have questions or concerns about your indoor air quality? Contact us to learn more.

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook

Facebook

Tweet about this on Twitter

Share on LinkedIn

Email this to someone

mold in the home

10 Mold Prevention Tips Every Home Owner Should Know

Posted by | home mold | No Comments

As many homeowners will tell you, mold prevention is a key part of keeping your home in decent shape.

Why is mold such an issue? For starters, mold can grow anywhere: on food, clothing, carpet, paper, and so on. It often grows in places you can’t see, such as above ceiling tiles and the backside of drywall.

If undetected, mold produces irritants and allergens that may cause various health ailments. Plus, removing mold is often a costly affair. The best way to deal with mold is to prevent it from becoming a problem.

Want to know more about preventing mold in the house? Here are 10 tips should provide all the help you need.

1. Identify Problem Areas

Though you can’t completely mold-proof your home, you can make it more mold-resistant.

This involves doing an audit of your home. Are there any persistent leaks in the house? Have you experienced basement flooding recently?

In some cases, you might only need to rip up a carpet in a damp basement to prevent mold from growing. Other times, you may need to turn to waterproofing. No matter what the problem is, address it as soon as possible.

2. Improve Home Circulation

The more temperatures drop, the less moisture the air is able to hold. If you don’t have good airflow in your house, that extra moisture could become a problem. Sometimes, it may cause mold to appear on your walls, floors, and windows.

How can you improve your home’s circulation? Well, letting some fresh air in would be a good first step. Start by opening doors between your rooms and moving some furniture away from walls.

3. Dry Wet Areas Immediately

If you deal with wet areas right away, there won’t be time for mold to grow.

This includes tackling water accumulation from a leaky pipe or seepage after heavy rain within 24 to 48 hours. In case of a flood, take out any carpets and furniture that you can’t dry completely.

This also goes for everyday occurrences. By leaving wet clothes in the washing machine, you’re inviting mold into your home. Instead, hang them to dry in an area with decent air circulation.

4. Direct Water Away From Foundation

Are you dealing with crawl space or basement seepage? Most of the time, this means that some water is collecting in the ground around your home. If so, your number one priority should be to slope the water away from the house.

To begin with, don’t put your plants too close to the foundation. Every time you’re watering them, some water could escape toward your home. If you’re using a sprinkler to water your lawn, don’t point it too close to the foundation.

5. Monitor Indoor Humidity

As you may know, humidity control plays a big part in preventing mold.

According to the EPA, you should keep your indoor humidity levels between 30 and 60 percent. You can measure humidity with moisture meters, which are available in most hardware stores.

Not sure what to focus on? You can identify excessive humidity by condensation on pipes, walls, and windows. If you notice any condensation, dry the surface and start looking for the source of moisture.

6. Check Your Plants

Though plants help keep your indoor air clean, they’re also susceptible to mold growth. Why is that? Simple: the moist soil can serve as an ideal breeding ground for mold spores.

That said, there’s no need to get rid of your leafy friends. Adding some Taheebo tea to your houseplant water is a great way to hinder mold growth. Even in rainforests, the oil of this fascinating tree can withstand fungi.

7. Prevent Basement Condensation

Have you noticed a musty smell in your basement recently? That could be an indicator of moisture build-up on the floor and the walls.

Want to know how to prevent mold in the basement? It all comes down to stopping further condensation. You can do that by installing a dehumidifier or a foundation drain.

If you’re dealing with excessive moisture intrusion, hire a contractor to waterproof the area. This should be your last resort, but try not to put off the call for too long.

8. Get Mold-Resistant Products

Are you renovating your home or building a new one? If so, consider using mold-resistant products.

For example, did you know that traditional drywall contains a gypsum core and four plies of paper? By comparison, mold-resistant drywall is paperless. Instead, the core is protected by fiberglass, which makes it water-resistant.

As you can imagine, this type of drywall is useful in areas prone to wetness. Kitchens, bathrooms, basements, and laundry rooms all fit the bill. Mold-resistant gypsum boards are also a decent alternative to traditional drywall.

9. Clean Your Gutters and Downspouts

If your roof gutters are full of debris, the water won’t be able to flow through them. The solution is to clean your gutters on a regular basis. Also, watch out for stains on the ceiling after a storm — this is a solid indicator of leaks.

Speaking of storms, make sure your downspouts are ready for them. In order for rainwater to flow away from the foundation, the downspouts must be graded properly. If they’re not, go ahead and extend them.

10. Use Proper Ventilation

Sometimes, even the simplest household tasks can encourage mold growth.

This is why your high-moisture areas (kitchen, bathroom, etc.) must have proper ventilation. Any appliances that produce moisture should vent to the outside. Opening a window when washing or cooking is also a good idea.

If you live in a humid climate, you may have to use an AC unit or dehumidifier. Of course, keep in mind that these units can produce moisture themselves. To prevent that, clean them according to manufacturer’s instructions.

More on Mold Prevention

As you can see, mold prevention is not a simple task. Still, detecting problems before they occur is preferable to dealing with them later. These 10 tips we’ve outlined above will help you do just that.

Is your mold problem getting out of control? Don’t panic just yet — we can help you out! Contact us right here, and we’ll get back to you.

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook

Facebook

Tweet about this on Twitter

Share on LinkedIn

Email this to someone

air quality testing

5 Reasons Why You Should Do Periodic Air Quality Testing

Posted by | Home Air Quality | No Comments

There’s endless information about outdoor air pollution, but what about the air in our lounges and kitchens?

Since we spend plenty of time indoors, the quality of the air we breathe while inside has become a significant concern. From spacious houses to cozy apartments, having clean, healthy air inside our rooms can improve our overall health and wellbeing.

But how do you know if you have clean air indoors? Well, in many cases, you need advanced air quality testing technology, such as VOC testing devices and carbon monoxide detectors.

Whether you do it on your own or use a professional air quality testing service, testing the air can help you make the best decisions for your home.

In this piece, we’ll discuss the importance of indoor air quality, how it’s measured, and five reasons to test your indoor air quality.

Why is the Quality of Indoor Air Important?

Indoor air pollutants may cause a wide variety of problems ranging from instant ones like eye and nose irritation to long-term medical conditions like heart disease and cancer.

There are obvious benefits to having clean indoor air. After all, if you aren’t breathing in huge amounts of pet dander or dust, you’re unlikely to suffer from coughing or respiratory problems like COPD and asthma.

But not all air pollutants are as noticeable as dust. Some have no smell and are completely invisible. Some pollutants like asbestos or lead may have been in your house for ages. This makes it even harder to detect and remove them.

Measuring Air Quality

Now that you know why it’s essential to have a clean environment indoors, you can take smart steps to improve the air inside your house. However, you can’t get rid of the contaminants unless you know what they are. This means you must do air quality testing.

When you want to test your indoor air for various pollutants, you’ve got two options. You can test the air yourself or hire a professional.

What Are the Reasons to do Indoor Air Quality Testing?

The quality of the air in your home is vital for your health as well as comfort. Certain air pollutants may have long-term effects on your health.

Here are five main pollutants that every homeowner should know before performing an air quality test in their home.

  • Carbon monoxide
  • Allergies and Asthma
  • Mold
  • Radon
  • VOCs

Carbon Monoxide Gas

Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the biggest issues many of us face at home. From 2010 to 2015, 2, 244 people died due to accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. You might be inhaling this toxic gas if you’ve got a faulty gas line, blocked fireplace vent, or damaged water heater.

Carbon monoxide is odorless and colorless, so installing carbon monoxide alarms near fuel-burning appliances and bedrooms is the best way to uncover it.

Carbon monoxide is life-threatening because it stops oxygen from getting to the vital organs. Other symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headaches, dizziness, and nausea. At worst, you will die.

That’s why it’s critical to have an expert conduct an air quality test in your home.

VOCs

After a simple paint project or remodel, it’s necessary to conduct a test for VOCs (volatile organic compounds).

Volatile organic compounds are released by building materials, aerosol cans, and paint products. They’re mostly found indoors and are a major contributor to indoor air pollution.

If you’ve got frequent throat, nose, or eye irritation in your household, testing the VOC levels in your air can be important in finding a solution.

Although air quality testing for many VOCs may be unreliable because of the lack of indoor air quality standards to interpret results, it may help detect very dangerous VOCs like formaldehyde. This toxin is found in fabrics, wood, combustion appliances, tobacco smoke, etc.

Radon

Radon is an odorless, invisible, and tasteless gas that may be present in your home. According to EPA, it’s the leading contributor to lung cancer in America.

Radon may be found outdoors and indoors, but it is most often found indoors. It occurs when uranium in the soil breaks down naturally, moving through the ground and up into the air. Buildings then trap radon inside, which is why it is a serious threat to homeowners.

When buying a house, you should always have an expert conduct a radon test. If they find above average radon levels, they can help you neutralize the problem.

Allergies and Asthma

If you or your loved ones suffer from asthma or allergies, air quality testing can help you know what to do to ease the symptoms of both conditions.

Indoor air irritants and allergens play a significant role in the intensity of an asthma attack. A residential indoor air quality testing can find out if there’s dust, pet dander, or pollen in the air.

Pet dander, dust, and mold are a significant trigger for people with allergies or asthma. Even if you own no pet, it’s still advisable to test the air and find out what could have been in your home before or if there’s a creature bringing it in.

Mold and Mildew

Apart from chemical pollutants, there are all kinds of biological pollutants to worry about, such as mold, fungus, mildew, and even viruses and bacteria.

These vicious microorganisms thrive in humid, warm air. That means you must be extra careful about reducing the humidity and taking care of any water leaks in basements and bathrooms.

Mold can cause various symptoms such as respiratory conditions (especially for those with breathing problems or asthma), as well as skin and eye irritation.

Unlike other air pollutants, mold can be detected by the eye, although some situations may require an air quality test for mold.

The Bottom Line

We all want to breathe clean, healthy air at home and not the contaminated air outside. An air quality testing will help to uncover the dangerous pollutants in your home.

To fix the quality of air in your home, be sure to talk to the specialists at CleanFirst Restoration. Contact us to set up an appointment.

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook

Facebook

Tweet about this on Twitter

Share on LinkedIn

Email this to someone

asbestos

Asbestos: Facts You Should Know About This Dangerous Substance

Posted by | asbestos | No Comments

You might think that asbestos exposure was more of an issue decades ago, before it was known how harmful it is to our health. But that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Currently, 125 million people worldwide are exposed to asbestos at their job, and millions more exposed daily.

It’s estimated that 50% of occupation-related deaths are caused by asbestos.

We’re almost positive that you’ve heard of asbestos before, but do you know exactly what it is? Or what it can do to our bodies if we’re exposed?

Since asbestos is found in many different products and involved in many occupations, it’s important to understand the serious health risks associated with it. Keep reading to learn what asbestos is, and what you can do to avoid exposure.

What Is Asbestos?

Asbestos isn’t just one thing. It refers to a combination of 6 mineral components that combine to form fiber bundles. These bundles have been, and still are, used in a number of industrial applications.

Where Is Asbestos Used?

Since asbestos is resistant to heat, chemicals, fire, and other harsh elements, it’s often used in places where these things are common. This includes:

  • Building/construction
  • Insulation
  • Roofing
  • Shipbuilding
  • Automotive industry
  • Plastics
  • Tiling/ceilings

These are by no means all of the places where asbestos is used. But from just these few examples, you can see how asbestos can essentially be found anywhere and permeates many aspects of our society.

While many governments now ban the use of asbestos in buildings and other applications, older buildings, cars, and products still contain asbestos.

You Can Still Be Exposed to Asbestos

Like we just said, you can still be exposed to asbestos on a day to day basis. It’s not rare, either. It’s estimated that around 240,000 Canadian homes could still contain asbestos.

Even though new homes and buildings aren’t being made with asbestos, the risk of exposure is still high.

What Can Asbestos Exposure Lead To?

For all this talk about exposure, we haven’t really gone over the dangers of asbestos. The fact is that asbestos is a carcinogen, meaning it can (and often does) cause cancer.

There is no safe level of exposure to asbestos. Most carcinogens have a certain level that’s OK to be exposed to. For example, formaldehyde is a carcinogen, but it won’t cause cancer when you’re exposed at low levels.

Asbestos is always dangerous no matter how much or how long you’re exposed to it. In Canada, asbestos exposure is the number one cause of occupational death.

And while Canada does have laws regulating and banning asbestos for current day use, that doesn’t erase the fact that it’s already in many buildings and millions of Canadians have been exposed for years.

Most of the damage from asbestos will be in your lungs. When you’re exposed to asbestos, you inhale it and it goes directly to your lungs. It’s there where it will cause the most damage.

Asbestosis

Even if you don’t develop a serious illness from asbestos, you can experience a number of negative health effects. Some symptoms you could experience include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Dry cough
  • Chest tightness
  • Appetite loss

If you’re exposed for a long time, you can eventually develop asbestosis. Usually, you won’t notice these and other more serious symptoms until 20-30 years after you were exposed.

If you develop asbestosis, you can also experience deformities in your nails along with enlarged fingertips.

Diagnosing asbestosis will involve a few steps taken by your doctor. First, they’ll listen to your breathing to see if they identify any abnormal breath sounds that would indicate lung damage.

They’ll want to take a chest x-ray to examine your lungs as well. They might also want to perform tests to evaluate your lung function.

In the long term, this can cause chronic lung issues, and it can lead to fatal complications. You can’t cute asbestosis, but you can take steps to make breathing easier with inhalers or oxygen masks.

Cancer Risk

Perhaps the biggest risk of asbestos exposure is the huge risk of developing cancer.

Symptoms of lung cancer or other types of cancer caused by asbestos exposure (most often mesothelioma) won’t develop until years after the initial exposure. It can take 15-40 years after initial exposure to develop an illness.

The general symptoms to look out for include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Persistant cough
  • Chest pain/tightness/discomfort
  • Wheezing
  • Coughing up blood
  • Weight loss/loss of appetite
  • Chronic lung infections

These symptoms mirror those for asbestosis, so you’ll need to get a doctor’s diagnosis to be sure.

Unfortunately, these symptoms don’t arise until the cancer reaches a later stage. The best way to avoid this is to have regular screening by your doctor, especially if you know that you’ve been exposed to asbestos.

How to Protect Yourself

After all of this scary information, you might be freaked out. The good news is that there are ways to protect yourself from asbestos exposure, even after you’ve been exposed.

If you know that you’ve been exposed to asbestos, especially in large doses over a long period of time, then you should have regular screenings and check-ups with your doctor. This way, you can catch any disease or cancer early, which will give you a better chance at recovery.

If you believe your home contains asbestos, there are ways to remove it. Home and buildings built before 1986 have a high chance of having asbestos. You should look into asbestos removal to make sure your home is safe to live in.

Important Asbestos Facts: Wrapping Up

Asbestos is a dangerous carcinogen that can cause serious illness. While you won’t see or develop symptoms right away, exposure is extremely serious and shouldn’t be taken lightly.

Hopefully this article has helped you understand the dangers of asbestos a little more so you can take steps to avoid exposure and make your home safe.

If you have any other questions, don’t hesitate to contact us. We can answer any questions you have about your home, asbestos removal, and more.

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook

Facebook

Tweet about this on Twitter

Share on LinkedIn

Email this to someone

causes of mold

10 Common Causes of Mold in Homes

Posted by | Blog, home mold | No Comments

One of the most common forms of mold found in many homes is known as Alternaria.

You may know exactly what it looks like, typically characterized by its velvet-like texture and dark green and brown coloring.

Alternaria mold tends to grow where ever dampness occurs, and throughout the average home, this could be a number of obvious places.

It’s a hyper-allergenic mold, meaning long-term exposure can lead to respiration problems in the upper respiratory tract, nose, and mouth.

So if you’re wondering what the exact causes of mold could be in your home, we outline it all in this blog.

Common Causes of Mold in Your Home

Mold can grow just about anywhere but is most commonly found in areas such as bathrooms, kitchens, basements, cabinets, and near pipes or ducting areas. It only needs a few elements to grow and proliferate throughout your home, the key element being moisture.

Mold behind drywall may be one of the most common household problem areas as drywall, wood, and cotton are ideal food sources.

Ceiling mold is also highly common due to a lack of ventilation and accumulation of moisture.

If the temperature is right, there is a moisture source and enough oxygen, you can be sure mold will begin to grow and spread.

Here are 10 of the most common causes of mold in your home:

1. Persistent Humidity

If you live in an area where humidity is consistently high, you may have a problem with mold. This is only natural due to the high moisture content in the air.

This type of mold will most likely grow on walls, ceilings, in dark closets, under the kitchen sink, etc.

Mold caused by humidity is especially common if you live near the ocean or a large body of water and could also be worsened by a lack of ventilation.

Moisture build-up in the air indoors could massively increase mold growth, so make sure to ventilate your home well, especially in the warmer months.

2. Leaking Pipes in the Home

This is one of the most common causes of mold behind drywall and in under-sink cupboards.

Leaking pipes can also contribute to ceiling and wall mold, as a leak could be coming from the geyser or piping in your roof. If you notice a build-up of mold in any of these areas, the natural choice would be to check your piping for leaks!

3. A Leaking Roof

A roof which is partially damaged due to wear and tear or severe weather conditions can quickly lead to mold build-up in your home.

Over time, a slow leak can build-up a huge backlog of moisture in your ceiling or attic. This can eventually proliferate into mold that grows on walls and ceiling boards.

Make sure to check your attic or the tiles and facades of your ceiling for damage and potential leaks to avoid a mold problem in your home.

4. A Build-Up of Condensation

During the winter time, some homes may experience a build-up of condensation on cold surfaces due to the fluctuations in temperature.

Some of these cold surfaces include metal piping, concrete surfaces, floor tiles and even brick walls.

If you notice that condensation build-up is a real problem in your home, make sure to ventilate each room properly in order to remove the condensation.

Otherwise, these condensation pockets are prime real estate for mold spores and the proliferation of mold growth.

5. Poor Ventilation in Your Home

As we mentioned before, a poorly ventilated home is a magnet for the growth of mold and the spreading of mold spores.

The stagnant air throughout your home is one of the best environments for the growth of mold. So make sure to rid your home of it on a daily basis!

Steam created by appliances, cooking, and bathing creates humidity in your home, leaving surfaces damp and sticky.

Remove the moisture from your home and you’ll remove the likelihood of mold growth.

6. Wet and Damp Clothing

Picture this: you’ve just done a load of washing, taken it out of the washing machine, and set it aside to hang up later on. But you forget and the damp clothing sits for a full day, if not more.

Believe it or not, mold only needs 24 hours to grow and proliferate.

During the warm months of spring and summer, wet or damp clothing lying around your house can greatly contribute to an existing mold problem. So remember to hand your washing ASAP!

7. Home Flooding

Unfortunately, one of the realities you’ll face after you experience the drama of home flooding is mold growth.

Your home will typically take days, or even weeks, before it’s completely dried out after a flood, so this makes the ideal environment for mold to grow.

What’s more concerning is that this environment can also lead to the growth of dangerous, toxic mold known as Stachybotrys chartarum.

You will need to bring in a mold cleaning expert after your home has completely dried out for mold testing and a thorough inspection.

8. A Damp Basement

Due to the fact that they are below ground level, it’s only natural that a basement is exposed to higher levels of moisture.

They are also more likely to contain greater levels of humidity due to a lack of ventilation or poor circulation of air.

As such, this combination of both dampness and increased humidity will lead to the growth of mold.

Water leaks from your home above may also accumulate in your basement. This is why you should keep your basement well-maintained in order to prevent a dangerous mold outbreak.

9. Foundation Dampness

If the slope of your yard has been landscaped in such a way that water fails to drain away from your house, you could have a mold problem on your hands.

Rainwater and garden moisture can slowly trickle and pool around the foundations of your home, contributing to the growth of mold on walls.

A landscaping expert can help modify your yard and its slope. Alternatively, drains can be dug out to direct water away from your foundations.

10. A Leaking Air-Conditioning System

Most homes throughout the country feature an air conditioning system, which can bring with it the growth of mold known as Mucor.

This is an allergenic type of mold which grows quickly into thick, white patches below leaking air conditioning systems or due to condensation build-up.

Make sure to check your air conditioner piping, ducting and filters to ensure there are no leaks or a build-up of moisture.

Looking for Mold Removal Specialists?

With over 25 years of experience in the industry of mold removal, we are proud to say we are one of the best in the business in Toronto and GTA.

If you’re looking for a free mold inspection, information on the causes of mold or mold removal tips, we’re happy to help!

Get in touch with Clean First for unrivaled experience, professionalism and mold removal expertise.

Find the post useful? Help others by sharing it!Share on Facebook

Facebook

Tweet about this on Twitter

Share on LinkedIn

Email this to someone